My Blog
By Irving M. Luftig, BSC, DPM
March 02, 2022
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Foot Care  
Proactive Foot Care For AthletesPounding pavement, intense box jumps, PR deadlifts…we couldn’t do the activities and exercise we love without healthy feet and ankles. Of course, feet and ankles are also prone to injury. The good news is that there are strategies and tips you can follow to proactively keep your feet and ankles healthy to reduce your risk for sports-related injuries.

Choose the Right Shoes for the Job

There’s a reason there are shoes just for runners, shoes for weightlifters, and shoes for soccer players. Every sport requires its own shoes that provide just the right cushioning, stability, and support for the feet and ankles. Wearing the right shoes for your chosen sport is imperative to providing your feet with exactly what they need whether it’s ankle stability for those quick side-to-side movements or added cushioning for power jumps.

Rotate Socks and Shoes Regularly

As you work out it’s natural for your feet to sweat; however, the last thing you want to do is leave your feet in sweaty shoes and socks. That’s why it’s always best to carry at least another pair of socks with you and to swap them out after exercise to prevent blisters or a nasty fungal infection. Always choose moisture-wicking socks to help wick away some of the sweat.

Know When to Get Rid of Your Shoes

No shoes are designed to last forever. While you may simply love your sneakers you have to recognize when to part ways and get a new pair. After all, shoes wear down over time and they are less likely to cushion or absorb shock, which can leave you prone to injuries. Shoes are only designed to last about 300-500 miles. If you see that the treads are wearing out this is a clear sign that it’s time to invest in a new pair of sneakers.

Train and Condition Regularly

It’s important that you condition your body and train even off-season so that your body is primed and ready once the season begins. Conditioning the body including the feet and ankles gets them prepared for activity, and it also means that you can increase intensity and duration gradually to reduce your risk for injury. Make sure that you are training throughout the season, even off-season.

Even if you aren’t dealing with foot or ankle problems, if you are physically active or an athlete, having a podiatrist that you turn to regularly for care and advice can go a long way to preventing injuries and other problems.
By Irving M. Luftig, BSC, DPM
February 14, 2022
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Blisters  
Preventing Blisters on Your FeetA blister can be a real nuisance. It can make it uncomfortable to walk around, let alone try to go on your run. Fortunately, there are some simple things you can do to reduce your risk of developing blisters. Take care of your feet and they will take care of you. Of course, if you have diabetes or nerve damage in your feet and you do find yourself dealing with a blister, it’s important to always turn to a podiatrist right away for care.

Wear the Proper Shoes

Whether you’re hiking, running, or simply walking to work, it’s important that you are wearing the appropriate shoes for the job. Shoes that don’t provide your feet with enough cushion and support, especially when pounding the pavement, can leave you dealing with blisters, calluses, and other foot injuries. Make sure that you are also getting shoes that provide the ideal fit. Shoes that are too tight or loose can rub against the skin and result in blisters.

Apply Padding

There are blister pads on the market for a reason! Even if you are wearing properly fitted footwear, you may still find that you need a little added protection for your feet. A blister pad can be used to protect a blister that you have or it can be used in places that are prone to blisters.

Wear the Right Socks

The socks that you wear are just as important for maintaining healthy feet as the shoes that you wear. Choose socks that wick away moisture and consider doubling up on socks if you are getting ready to participate in an activity that increases your chances of developing a blister. The added layer can provide more protection for your feet. If your socks become wet or moist, it’s important that you change your socks right away.

Use a Lubricant Before Exercise

Shoes and socks that rub against the feet can lead to blisters, so it’s important to reduce this type of friction by keeping feet lubricated. This is particularly important for runners or hikers. Apply petroleum jelly to the feet so that they are more likely to slide rather than rub against shoes and socks.

A podiatrist can recommend the appropriate footwear for you, provide custom orthotics and ensure that you provide your feet with the support and cushioning they need for all of your activities to prevent blisters from happening to you. If blisters are a common problem, talk with your podiatrist about how you can prevent this from happening.
By Irving M. Luftig, BSC, DPM
January 28, 2022
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Flat Feet   Fallen Arches  
Fallen ArchesFallen arches, better known as flat feet, are more common than you might realize. While many people have flat feet and don’t even know it, others are dealing with regular aches and pains in their feet due to fallen arches. If you think this could be you, a podiatrist can quickly diagnose this problem and provide you with effective strategies to keep fallen arches from also causing you pain.

What are some complications of fallen arches?

Some people have fallen arches but never experience any issues; however, sometimes fallen arches can lead to,
  • Foot, heel, and arch pain, particularly when standing or walking
  • Muscle pain
  • Leg cramps
  • Shooting leg pains that start at the soles of the feet
  • Swelling of the feet or tenderness in the soles
Flat feet can also increase your risk for,
  • Plantar fasciitis
  • Shin splints
  • Bone spurs
  • Arthritis
  • Bunions
  • Lower back pain, hip pain, or knee pain
If you are experiencing pain with movement, trouble walking, or balancing issues, it’s important that you turn to a podiatrist to find out whether flat feet could be to blame.

What causes fallen arches?

Arches develop around the age of 2 or 3 years old; however, sometimes arches never develop. Genetics can increase your risk for flat feet. Sometimes injuries or other foot problems can cause flat feet to develop as an adult. Certain conditions can also increase your risk for flat feet including,
  • Diabetes
  • Cerebral palsy
  • Achilles tendonitis
  • High blood pressure
  • Obesity
  • Pregnancy
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
How are fallen arches treated?

If fallen arches do not cause any problems then you don’t really need to do anything about them; however, it is important to recognize whether certain issues you’re dealing with could be the result of fallen arches. If so, your podiatrist may recommend a wide range of nonsurgical treatment options including,
  • Nonsteroid anti-inflammatory medications
  • Physical therapy
  • Orthotics and arch support
  • Stretching exercises
  • Bracing
  • Custom shoes
If your flat feet are causing you to deal with easily achy, sore, and fatigued feet, know that a podiatrist can help you get your foot problems back on track with the proper care. Call your podiatrist today!
By Irving M. Luftig, BSC, DPM
January 20, 2022
Category: Foot Injuries
Tags: Foot Fracture  
Foot Fracture vs. Broken BoneThe simple answer is that there is no difference between a fracture and a break. From shattered bones to hairline cracks, any damage done to the bones of the feet is considered a fracture. No matter what you want to call it, it’s still important that you visit your podiatrist right away for treatment.

What are the types of fractures?

There are different kinds of foot fractures based on the type of bone that’s impacted. Fractures can impact the toes, heel, sesamoid bone, and metatarsal bone, as well as the ankles. Stress fractures are hairline fractures that occur as a result of repeated stress placed on the foot. This is common in athletes.

What are the warning signs of a fractured foot?

There are certain symptoms to be on the lookout for if you suspect that you might have a fractured foot. Some signs of a foot fracture include:
  • Pain that gets worse with movement
  • Swelling
  • Bruising
  • Limited mobility or restricted range of motion
  • Trouble bearing weight on the injured foot
  • Weakness
  • Deformity or misshapen foot
Foot pain, particularly after an accident or injury, is a telltale sign of a fractured foot that should be addressed by a podiatrist.

How is a fractured foot treated?
 
How your podiatrist treats your foot fracture will depend on the location, severity, and type. This is why it’s important to visit your foot doctor as soon as possible after injury. Some minor fractures can be treated with home care including:
  • Ample rest
  • Elevation
  • Compression
  • Pain relievers to alleviate pain and swelling
  • Icing
More moderate or severe fractures may require more aggressive treatment options to speed up the recovery process. Additional treatment options include,
  • Physical therapy and rehabilitation
  • Specialized exercises
  • Splinting
  • Protective shoe or boot
  • Casting, crutches, or immobilization (for more severe fractures)
Don’t ignore the warning signs of a fractured foot. If you are having trouble moving around or you are suddenly experiencing foot pain, particularly after an injury, the first call you should make is to your podiatrist. Call a foot and ankle specialist today to get the care you need.
By Irving M. Luftig, BSC, DPM
January 03, 2022
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Arthritis  
Arthritis and Your FeetIs the pain and stiffness you’re experiencing in your feet and ankles caused by arthritis? If arthritis is left untreated, it’s possible that your symptoms could become so severe that they could affect your quality of life. Therefore, your podiatrist may recommend seeking medical attention right away to reduce the amount of damage to the joints.

What are the signs and symptoms of arthritic feet?

Wondering if you could be dealing with arthritis in your feet? Some warning signs include,
  • Joint pain and stiffness
  • Joint swelling
  • Joint warmth and tenderness to the touch
  • Pain with movement
  • Increased pain and swelling after rest
How do podiatrists treat arthritis of the feet?

There are several different treatment options that we have available to handle your arthritis symptoms:

Medication: Over-the-counter anti-inflammatories like ibuprofen can help reduce inflammation and pain. While those with more minor bouts of arthritis can often find relief from these medications, some patients may need a prescription-strength pain reliever to manage more severe symptoms.
Steroid injections: A dose of corticosteroids administered directly into the joint can help greatly reduce pain and inflammation. While this can be an effective treatment option, the effects are only temporary.
Physical Therapy: There are some exercises you can perform to help increase flexibility and movement while also strengthening your foot and ankle muscles to prevent further problems. Talk to your foot doctor about the different exercises you can perform each day to help improve your foot health and reduce arthritis symptoms.
Lifestyle changes: You should minimize certain activities that could cause symptoms to worsen. This includes switching from more high-impact exercises such as running to lower-impact exercises such as swimming, which will take some of the stress and pressure off the feet and ankles. If necessary we may also advise you to lose weight, as well.
Customized orthotics: Wearing orthotics made specifically for your feet can help take pressure off certain areas of the feet and help reduce pain while moving. Talk to your podiatrist about custom-made orthotics and whether they could improve your condition.

If these conservative treatments don’t do much to help your condition, then we may need to discuss the possibility of surgery. There are different kinds of surgery that we can perform and a lot will depend on the severity and cause of your arthritis. Those with advanced forms of arthritis may have to consider a total ankle replacement.




This website includes materials that are protected by copyright, or other proprietary rights. Transmission or reproduction of protected items beyond that allowed by fair use, as defined in the copyright laws, requires the written permission of the copyright owners.